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    Personal Insurance Blog

    MA Surcharges: 20 Minor Violations That Increase Insurance

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Insurance

    Sun, Feb 05, 2017 @ 11:31 AM

    Cover your automobile with auto insurance from Andrew Gordon IncMost people understand that a major moving violation (DUI, reckless driving etc) will lead to a surcharge by giving you ‘points’.  But not everyone knows that many minor moving violations will also result in surcharges.

    Here are some you may not have known:

    1. Failing to stop for a blind pedestrian- regardless of circumstance, you MUST stop for a blind pedestrian
    2. Leaving your car running unattended – we’re all guilty of this one, but it could get you ticketed
    3. Lane change without a directional signal (either a hand signal or a blinker) – again, a common infraction that is more than courtesy; it’s the law
    4. Failing to yield right of way to an emergency vehicleBe prepared for automobile accidents with auto from Gordon Insurance
    5. Failure to fasten a trailer with proper safety chains and/or equipment
    6. Tailgating –yes, you can be ticketed for following another car too closely -  do your fellow driver a favor and stay off his tail 
    7. Keeping your high beams on – be mindful of who you’re flashing with your brights; if it’s a trooper, you could get ticketed
    8. Failure to use headlights from 30 minutes after sunset to 30 minutes before sunrise
    9. Wearing ear buds or headphones while operating- Bluetooth is ok, headphones are not
    10. Improper use of your horn – if you honk just because you’re angry; you’re guilty. A horn is used to alert other cars of danger. 
    11. Leaving your keys in the ignition – even if your engine is off, your keys should not be in the ignition Protect your vehicle and automobile interests with auto and advice from Gordon Insurance
    12. Passing on the right 
    13. Liquor: any minor cannot have liquor in the vehicle and anyone over 21 cannot have an open container in the vehicle
    14. Operating a vehicle without all mirrors functioning properly
    15. Passing on a motorcycle not in single-file
    16. Operating your vehicle on a bet or wager
    17. Obstructing funerals and processions
    18. Operating through a ‘peekhole’ in the windshield – if you have an incompletely defrosted windshield, don’t drive the vehicle. Let the windshield defrost first
    19. Passing any vehicle with less than 400 feet of view
    20. Employing any unlicensed operator
    For more information, visit the RMV website and check us out at www.agordon.com.

    INSURANCE QUESTION?   Get Quote

    Corbin Foucart

    Tags: auto, insurance, surcharges, minor, violations, ticketable, offenses, laws, ma, driving

    What is Reckless Driving?

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Insurance

    Fri, Jan 20, 2017 @ 12:12 PM

    Do not drive recklessly and cover your automobile with auto from andrew gordon inc insurance norwell maWhat is reckless driving, what are the penalties, and how will it affect your insurance?

    I’ve found that very few people have actually put time into answering these questions on the internet; so here’s a guide outlining the basics of reckless driving in Massachusetts.

    Reckless driving is legally defined as a mental state in which the driver displays wanton disregard for the rules of the road. The standards of reckless driving in Massachusetts are not specifically defined, but subjectively noted as a manner that shows you are indifferent to whether someone could be seriously injured or killed. Here are some things that will generally constitute a reckless driving charge:

    1. An egregious violation of the speed limit (this usually means driving 20-30 mph over the limit or on the highway or in a residential area)
    2. Unsafe lane changes (we’ve all seen this happen; people weaving in and out of lanes on the highway to pass as many people as quickly as possible)
    3. Drag Racing
    4. Passing on a solid line or passing on a curve.
    5. Passing a stopped school bus.
    6. Leaving the scene of an accident

    Reckless driving also usually goes hand in hand with impaired/drunk driving charges.

    Stop reckless driving and stay safe with auto from andrew gordon inc insurance norwell ma

    Reckless Driving Penalties

    Reckless driving by itself is a misdemeanor in the state of Massachusetts and is generally handled on a case-by-case basis. Because it is a criminal charge, there will be a fine and not more than two and a half years of incarceration in extreme cases. There is also the possibility of your license being suspended or revoked again depending on your offense.

    The harsher penalties are going to come from your insurer

    Reckless Driving and Your Insurance

    Reckless driving not only carries with it legal costs and time in court; it also upends your insurance. The cost is only the first part - losing your choice of an insurance company is the real kicker. We rated a 2008 Ford Taurus, with $100,000 / $300,000 liability limits, and including collision and comprehensive coverage, driving 12,000 miles per year, living in Pembroke. Of our dozen or so companies that we represent, Peerless Insurance offers the best rate for our rater, at $543 per year.

    Then she gets caught and pinned with a Reckless Driving charge.

    Goodbye Peerless.

    Hello MAIP, the Massachusetts Auto Insurance Plan, aka, the Pool. Because insurance companies don’t want to insure someone with a reckless driving charge, MAIP is a state run mechanism that assigns a carrier to take that driver. MAIP is subject to a ceiling rate, meaning whoever gets the assignment can only charge as high as the MAIP rate, which in our case is now $1,489. Same coverage, same Pembroke home town, but one Reckless driving charge.

    Thus, not only did your auto insurance cost nearly triple, you lost your choice of insurance companies as well. Two hands on the wheel!

    Learn more about your auto insurance options here

      INSURANCE QUESTION?   
    Corbin Foucart

    Tags: auto, insurance, reckless, rules of the road, ma, driving, car, safe

    How is the Cost of My Car Insurance Policy Determined?

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Insurance

    Fri, Jan 20, 2017 @ 12:10 PM

    Have you ever wondered how your car insurance rates are calculated?  What affects that number on the bottom of the page? Here’s the answer:

    1. Understand how your auto insurance policy and rates are determined with Andrew Gordon IncWhat type of car you drive- some cars cost more to insure than others do. Your rate can be affected by how likely your car is to be stolen, its age, the cost of any future repairs, and how safe it is (or isn’t).
    2. Your driving record- your driving record largely determines how well you drive (at least in the eyes of your insurance provider). The fewer incidents you’ve been involved in, the lower your premium will be. If you have a slew of accidents and driving violations on your road resume, expect to pay significantly more than if you have a clean record.
    3. Where you live- Outside of your own driving ability, some areas are simply safer to drive in than others, both in terms of crime and accident statistics. Your rate can vary depending upon where you garage your car as well.
    4. The number of miles you drive each year- Statistics says by the law of large numbers that the probability of an accident increases with the amount that you drive. Therefore expect a higher rate if you put hefty mileage onto your vehicle each year.
    5. Your age- Young drivers (especially males) will have to pay augmented rates. Generally insurance providers divide the “steps” into drivers who have been on the road for under three years, three to six years, and more than six years.
    6. Your credit- for many insurance providers, your credit score can have an impact on your insurance rates.
    7. Coverage- like any other insurance rate, the price is partially determined by the coverage you already have. Make sure you shop around and get the best possible price for the coverage you need.

    The good news: There are a variety of auto insurance discounts available to insurance customers. Learn more about our auto insurance policies and watch whiteboard videos for more information. Here’s one video made by our agency that explains the various discounts you may be eligible for:

    Learn more about your auto insurance options here, and read a staff member's blog on understanding your auto insurance policy here.

      INSURANCE QUESTION?  

    Corbin Foucart

    Tags: auto, insurance, cheap, Automobile, Vehicle, driving, car, quote, financial services

    Dangerous Places to Drive In Norwell: Be Careful!

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Staff

    Mon, Aug 11, 2014 @ 01:38 PM

    Despite being a small, rural town, Norwell has some pretty dangerous roads. In no particular order, here are some places where I drive with extra caution. 

    River Street: The average speed limit on River St. is 40 mph, so it's a fast road. There are some pretty sudden curves, particularly the dip when River St. intersects with Green St. This is a very dangerous spot; even though the speed limit is high, SLOW DOWN at this curve.

    Drive carefully in norwell when visiting andrew g gordon inc insurance

    Main Street: Main St. is fairly straight with a few hills, but make sure to slow down and drive 25 mph through Norwell Center. Also be careful when making turns onto Main Street, particularly left turns from South Street and Assinippi Ave.

    Prospect Street: This street's speed limit ranges, but there is a good chunk where you should drive 25 mph or below. There are many sharp and short hills and turns, so drive slowly and with caution.

    Bowker Street: This street is hilly, narrow, twisty, and woodsy. Go slow!

    Tiffany Road: This street only has one corner you really need to slow down for, but the speed limit is often ignored; many people drive up to 40 mph, but the speed limit is 25! Drive slower than you think you need to!

    Stetson Road: There's a straight spot on Stetson where the speed limit is high, but a VERY sharp turn following it. Slow down to 25 mph or slower for this turn! On the other end of Stetson is another deep dip where you should drive slowly. 

    Wildcat Lane: This is a very twisty and hilly street; I don't go any more than 30 mph at any part of this street. There is one particular sharp curve in the middle you need to slow down for.

    Drive safely, and come visit our office at 306 Washington Street!

     Visit andrew g gordon inc insurance in norwell ma

    For any auto insurance or other questions, contact us or call us at 800-649-3252! If you're a parent or a new driver, visit our new driver's page, or read some of our most frequently asked questions about auto insurance.

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    Tags: auto, insurance, accident, massachusetts, norwell, ma, driving, car, dangerous, driver, places, most dangerous roads

    Junior Operators: How to Get Your Permit

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Staff

    Thu, Jul 24, 2014 @ 10:49 AM

    Pass your permit test with auto insurance tips from andrew g gordon incIn Massachusetts, you can get your driving permit the day you turn 16. To get one's permit, a parent/guardian must take the soon-to-be driver to the RMV. You should fill out these permit test forms before you go to the RMV to make your visit quick and easy. After the forms are submitted and you are called for your turn, your permit picture is taken, there is a quick eye test, and some basic information is collected. Then you are sent to wait in line for the permit exam.

    The test is composed of 25 questions about general driving safety rules. You have 25 minutes to complete the test, which is administered electronically. You can take the driver's ed classroom component when you're 15 and 9 months old, 3 months before you're eligible for your permit on your 16th birthday. However, you are not required to take driver's ed before applying for your permit (I myself got my permit first).

    My biggest advice for passing the permit test is to actually read the driving manual and take lots of online practice tests. While reading the driving manual (which you can find online for free), I took screenshots of pages with important information. The permit test really does focus on small details and penalties for driving infractions. If there's a page in the driving manual with a chart on it, you should probably know that information.

    Here's a practice question; how far from the driver's home do most car accidents occur?

    a) 15 miles. b) 25 miles. c) 35 miles. d) 50 miles

    The answer? 25 miles! See, the information can be very specific, and while a 35 mile radius includes the 25 mile radius, you should take the questions very literally and choose the most correct answers. 

    Some great practice test websites are practicepermittest.com, driving-tests.org, and freedmvpracticetests.com. Take a LOT of these. A lot of the questions that will be on your real permit test will be on practice exams!

    Finally, relax. If you prepare and practice, you will pass. If you don't pass, it's not the end of the world; just go back to the RMV and take it again once you're better prepared. But keep in mind that each permit exam costs $30 to take (whether you pass or not), so do your best to pass it on your first try!

    Read another blog on the whole license-obtaining process, or check out our resources for new drivers and their parents. Feel free to contact us with any questions or a quote request!

    Contact Us  Teen Driver Kit

    Tags: auto, insurance, junior, permit, how to get permit, how to get license, massachusetts, driving, car, license, driver, teen, operators

    Junior Operators: How Do You Get Your License?

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Staff

    Mon, Jul 21, 2014 @ 11:01 AM

    If you're turning 16 or have a child who is, it's almost time to start driving. There are more steps to getting a junior operator's license in Massachusetts than you might think. For families who have their first child coming of the driving age or who need a refresher on what it takes to get that license, look no further.

    Prepare for your teen driving with a drivers ed course and auto insurance from andrew g gordon inc1. First, the teen must attend a driver's education course. These can be completed any time of the year. During the summer and school vacations (Winter, February, and April breaks), driving schools offer the whole course in a week; the student attends three classes (6 hours) a day for five days, like a school week. Throughout the entire year, classes are offered on Saturdays. There are 15 numbered different classes the student must attend, and you can call the driving school to see which ones are scheduled for which Saturdays. If possible, I definitely recommend completing the course in a week.

    Even if you're under the age of 18 and technically don't need to complete driver's ed to be eligible for your license, taking the course could lower your auto insurance rates.

    2. A parent has to attend a driver's ed course too! At least one parent/guardian must take a two hour class before the teen(s) can start driving hours. A parent class is good for 5 years in Massachusetts; for example, my parent attended a driving class for my sister getting her license 3 years ago. Since my parent had taken a class within the past 5 years, my mother didn't have to attend another one for me.

    3. Get your permit! You're eligible to get your permit the day you turn 16. I recommend getting it as soon as possible, because you must have had your permit for at least 6 months before you can take a road test. You must pass a permit test at the RMV, which contains material from the Massachusetts driver's manual. Come back next week for a blog about getting your permit.

    4. Driving hours! A student must spend 12 hours driving with an instructor from a driving school and 6 hours observing other student drivers. Every driving school schedules these differently, but for example, I had to schedule 12 sessions. I spent an hour driving every session and half an hour observing. It is easy to schedule these sessions online, or you can with a phone call.

    Prepare your new teen driver for driving with auto insurance from andrew g gordon inc5. This and step four go together; you must spend at least 40 hours driving with parent supervision and instruction. You should drive with your parent before your driving hours, so that driving school instructors can spend your sessions teaching you how to drive on the road instead of things like how to start your car. 

    6. Schedule your road test once you've completed the steps above and feel ready! You can do this online or by phone. Practice in the days leading up to your road test, especially on things you have trouble with. Come back soon for a blog about passing your road test. 

    Once you've completed these steps, congratulations! You can be a junior operator! Keep in mind, since you have to have had your permit for 6 months to get your license, you really must be 16 and 1/2 in Massachusetts. Additionally, a student driver cannot operate a vehicle without an adult in the car. Once a junior operator does have his/her license, he can't drive any friends under age 18 until he's been licensed for 6 months (this excludes family members). 

    Some popular local driving schools are North River (NR) Driving School in Pembroke, or AAA

    Ready your teen for the road with this new driving kit, and learn about auto insurance and possible discounts on our website. Contact a driving school or the RMV website for further information. 

    Teen Driver Kit Contact Us

    Tags: drivers, insurance, junior, operator, permit, steps, ed, course, how to get your license, massachusetts, driving, car, license, teen

    Road Responsibility

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Staff

    Wed, Aug 14, 2013 @ 10:01 AM

    Be responsible on the road like spiderman Andrew G Gordon Inc Insurance"With great power comes great responsibility," -credit to Stan Lee, creator of the famous Spiderman comics. But this saying applies to more than just superheroes of Lee's creation such as Spiderman, Batman, and Superman. This saying applies to everything when somebody has power, and if you have a driver's license and a car, then this saying applies to you.

    Think of it this way: an average sized car weighs approximately 4,000 lbs. That's one massive weapon you have right there.

    If you know anything about physics, you'll know that force is any sort of influence that makes an object experience or undergo a change. These changes can include direction as well as movement, such as change in velocity. And just to add to your physics knowledge, force is equal to the mass times the acceleration: (F=ma). So if we go back to that fun fact of a car weighing 4,000 lbs (or approximately 1800 kg), and we consider the car's acceleration before a crash- which can be very, VERY fast, then there's potential for A LOT of force to occur during a crash. There's also the whole kinetic energy thing going on there when the car is in motion and then stops. That requires work. For more information (that's probably a little more accurate) on the physics of car crashes, click here.

    Sorry to bore you with the physics lesson, but you've got to understand the power you have when it comes to driving a car. And, "with great power comes..."

    Take drivers ed and study for driving with auto insurance from andrew g gordon incGreat Responsibility

    There's a reason that people must do several things before becoming fully licensed. The driver's education classes are there for a reason. So are the other requirements, such as mandatory driving hours with parents/guardians as well as driving hours with the school. In Massachusetts, these training aspects of getting a license are taken very seriously and for good reason.

    Other rules apply to instill the full sense of responsibility in new drivers. For example, teen drivers have legal curfews and passenger restrictions. These laws are in effect to help enforce a teen's good driving behaviors and to prevent bad habits from being formed.

    For most teens, having a license can be taken for granted rather than considered a privilege. A license is something earned with hard work and time; many kids view this process as tedious and boring. It's important to not just go through the motions, but to actually develop good skills and good habits as a driver in order to keep everyone on the road safe at all times.

    The Responsibility Does Not Go Away

    Whether it's a teen driver and elderly driver, the responsibility that a driver has is always there. No speeding, making complete stops, wearing seatbelts, no texting, etc. The list seems to go on and on for road responsibilities, but that's because each and every law or advice can directly impact you as a driver.

    For adults that have not taken driver's ed for quite a while, there are always defensive driving courses available. These courses will help refresh your memory of all the laws and driving tips you may have forgotten about; additionally, these courses also usually come with a discount on your auto insurance! All Gordon customers will receive a discount on this course by signing up here.

    If there's a time to step up your road responsibility and your awareness of other drivers on the road, that time is right now. Nobody is completely free from the statistics of car crashes. Even if you're in an accident and you're not at-fault, you could still get seriously injured. It's important to step up your responsibility in order to keep yourself and others safe, and to avoid becoming the driver at-fault.

    For more information on Road Responsibility, download our Driving with Insurance in Mind eBook. It's completely free of charge and is sure to help anyone out. We also have several auto resources pages, like our one for new drivers, as well as more information on auto insurance. We provide free auto insurance quotes, so if you think the time is right to find some new auto insurance, simply contact us or fill out an online form here.

    Stay safe and remember the power you have when you are on the road. Visit our New Drivers Resources Page here.

    Driving with Insurance in Mind eBook  

    Tags: auto, Auto Insurance, driving, elderly drivers, drivers education, teen driving, teen drivers, road safety, road, defensive driving course, drivers ed, driving with insurance in mind, driving advice, spiderman, stan lee, superhero

    Cell Phone Laws and Driving in MA

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Staff

    Thu, Aug 01, 2013 @ 02:06 PM

    Dont break the law and text while driving get auto insurance from Andrew G Gordon IncDifferent people might tell you different things about cell phone usage in a car. Well, some of them might know what they're talking about, and others might not. But no worries! Here I am to clear the air about cell phone myths and driving in Massachusetts.

    It's Not Just a Cell Phone

    The registry defines anything that is a handheld OR portable electronic device that is capable of communicating with other persons as a "mobile electronic device". This does include, but is not limited to, cell phones. Other forms of a "mobile electronic device" include laptops, handheld videogame consoles (i.e. Nintendo DS), paging devices, iPods, iPads, etc.

    Cell Phone Usage

    • Now that we have defined a "mobile electronic device," know that any driver of any age is NEVER permitted to read, write, or send electronic messages while driving.
    • If a driver is over the age of 18, he/she is permitted to call someone/have somebody call him/her if one other condition is met: one hand must remain on the steering wheel at all times. However, do not fall victim to distracted driving by talking on the phone. Bluetooth and speaker phone options are available to be able to talk on the phone and have both hands on the wheel.
    • In the case of reporting an emergency, any driver of any age is allowed to use a "mobile electronic device" to report the emergency.

    Consequences of Breaking the Law

    Well first off, there's that whole greater chance of an accident thing going on here. That's very bad. You can injure yourself, somebody else, property, your car, and basically anything around you. That's the most immediate and direct effect of driving and texting.

    Secondly, there's the whole legal part. Breaking laws like these, which are in effect for very serious safety reasons, have harsh ramifications.

    Consequences:

    • Dont use your cell phone to text while driving prevent crashes with auto insurance from Andrew G Gordon Inc1st offense: $100 fine
    • 2nd offense: $250 fine
    • 3rd+ offense: $500 fine
    • Considered a moving violation
    • If found texting for an at-fault accident, driver is considered to have operated the vehicle in a reckless manner

    For junior operators:

    • 1st offense: junior operator loses permit or license for 60 days
    • 2nd offense: junior operators loses permit or license for 180 days
    • 3rd offense: junior operator loses permit or license for 1 year
    • Junior operator must pay $500 fine to get license reinstated
    • Junior operator must take an attitudinal adjustment class
    • Other fees and surcharges may apply

    To read the bill that fully explains this law, click here.

    I hope you keep in mind that texting and driving is never a good idea. Even if you are all alone, no pedestrians, no pets, no other moving vehicles in sight, taking your eyes off the road for a split second (average look away time is approximately five seconds) could result in disaster.

    Take a moment to remember all the lives that have been lost due to texting while driving, and be sure not to add your name to that list. The only way to do this is to not use your phone while driving. If it's really tempting, shut your phone off or put it in the backseat PLEASE. Stay safe, and if you have any questions or concerns feel free to contact us online (just not while you're driving). Learn more about auto insurance here.

    Driving with Insurance in Mind eBook  

    Tags: law, Auto Insurance, driving, texting, junior operator, cell phone, mobile phone, phone, electronic mobile device, texting and driving, teenage drivers

    What is Road Rage?

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Staff

    Tue, Feb 05, 2013 @ 05:11 PM

    Drive safe without road rage in your automobile with auto from andrew gordon incRoad rage is when the driver of a motor vehicle becomes angry and aggressive, often affecting the other drivers out on the road and creating an unsafe environment for drivers. But there's more to road rage than meets the eye.

    Legal Status

    California is the only state which has given the term "road rage" a legal definition. This makes sense, seeing as the term "road rage" originated in California after shootings on the highway. In Driver's Education classes, road rage is still taught as a driving term, and while students may laugh at the prospect of someone whipping out a bow-and-arrow to use against another driver, such cases have been reported. The lesson here? Road rage is no joke.

    Road Rage in Massachusetts

    Boston is one of the top cities in the country with high aggressive driving behavior. While there is no legal definition for "road rage" here, drivers can be charged with other offenses, such as aggressive driving- which certainly correlates/is a form of road rage. Other possible violations include speeding, reckless driving, driving to endanger others, etc. If you are enraged and driving, your car is essentially a large weapon. Keep that in mind, because if you are in an accident and somebody gets hurt because you were angry, your being angry is the farthest thing from an acceptable reason as to why you were driving so aggressively.

    Helpful Hints

    If you get road rage while driving, or experience another driver with road rage, keep these hints in mind:

    • Calm down. It's the road. We all know you want to get where you want to be as quickly as possible. But rationalize, is waiting five seconds for another driver to go (regardless of whether they cut you off or not) going to affect your overall arrival time? No.
    • Take deep breaths. If you are the angry driver, take some deep breaths as you consider all the ruckus you may be causing. Other drivers are going to become hostile towards you; road rage is a two-way street.
    • Re-evaluate the road. Notice how other drivers are reacting to the road rage at hand. If other drivers become angry and hostile, avoid them. By driving amongst enraged drivers, you will only join their ranks.

    Overall, the best solution for road rage is for everybody to remain calm. That is, if the hostile driver and the other drivers around them quickly realize the situation, adjust to common courtesy on the road, and continue onward with their lives, the roads of Massachusetts (and the rest of the world) would be a much safer place.

    If you would like to update your auto quote, click the button below. We'll shop the best policies for you so if you are ever the victim of road rage, because now you know better, you will have the best protection possible. Learn more about auto insurance here.

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    Tags: auto, safety, insurance, rage, angry, danger, accident, ma, driving, car, road

    A Car Accident Story

    Posted by Gordon Atlantic Staff

    Mon, Jan 28, 2013 @ 08:37 AM

    Drive safely in the winter and snow with your automobile covered by auto insurance Andrew gordon incI was in a car accident pretty recently. A lot of snow had fallen, school had not been delayed, and the roads had not been plowed in the slightest. Not even Main Street, the street that runs through the very heart of our town. To make matters worse, I don't even live on Main Street; I live in a neighborhood hidden in the woods.

    I left for school much earlier than normal. I figured that with the horrendous weather I would drive super slowly and cautiously because my commute would be twice as long. And I did. That didn't help my car from skidding under me and losing control of my wheel.

    I kid you not, I was going maybe 8 miles per hour around a curb that typically is taken at speeds of 25 miles per hour. I made it around the curb safely, but after the curb and onto the straightaway, my wheels refused to turn due to all the snow, and it kept turning- right into a guard rail on the opposite side of the road. Fortunately, no cars were in the other lane.

    That guard rail saved my life. I had never really considered the importance of guard rails before, but it embraced my car and even though the rail definitely bent under the weight, it did its job and prevented me from falling into a ditch. If that guard rail hadn't been there, who knows where I would be today. Alive? Disabled?

    Kudos to my seat belt too. If I hadn't been wearing it (I always do), the guard rail may not have made a difference. Sure, it would have stopped my car, but would it have prevented me from flying through my front windshield?

    Prevent car accidents in the winter snow with auto from Andrew gordon incThe point is, I faced a major reality check that day. Although it wasn't my first car accident, it was the first one where my safety and well-being had been extremely compromised. It made me rethink all the stupid moves that drivers make, such as breaking the speed limit, not wearing seatbelts, texting, etc. I wasn't even distracted; I was totally focused! It was an act of nature that sent me spinning out of control.

    So here's my two cents from this experience: Always wear your seat belt. Do not get distracted. Do not drive if you feel as if the weather or the road conditions will affect your driving. And all the other little things. Here's a couple of other driving hints: It's not cool to speed, to text, to not wear your seatbelt, or to make incomplete stops at stop signs and traffic lights. You only put yourself and others at danger, and when accidents like this happen (and they do) you are not going to want the reason to be because you were acting as a careless driver.

    My car was damaged. It received a lot less damage than I anticipated, but I had also anticipated arriving to school safely and without accident. Accidents are unplanned. Make sure you have all the coverage you need to cover yourself in case something like this happens to you. If your car gets out of control, there's no telling what it could hit- a guard rail, a tree, a house, another car...

    Be safe and cautious while driving. If you would like a free auto quote from us to best fit your needs, click the button below. We'll do the shopping for you. Learn more about auto insurance here

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    Tags: winter, story, auto, safety, personal, insurance, accident, bad, driving, car, weather, seatbelt

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