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    Gordon Atlantic employees Travel Blog

    Dumoine Fishing Trip 2016 Andrew G Gordon Ins. Norwell MA

    Posted by Geoffrey Gordon on Tue, Jul 05, 2016 @ 04:53 PM

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    Licensure  

    We got gas in New Hampshire, ending up at ZEC Dumoine at 6:30.  The licensing station closes at 7 and we still had two stations to go, so we were cutting it close.   The 7-day Quebec fishing license is about $70 CDN and is available at Lance’s at the entrance of Swisha, which is open 8-8 almost every day. 

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    Food

    Right when we got to camp on Tuesday, we went out fishing.  Kurt filleted his 22” catch and we had it after dinner, which was on the stove when we pulled in, about 10. When we woke up on Wednesday, we did not tarry over coffee or breakfast, as we had reserved a say at Benway, a 300 acre lake.  After the morning activities on Wednesday,   Peter turned our camp lunch fixins into a delectable tuna salad on toasted flatbread and cheese.  After a short fishing excursion early on Thursday morning, I came back to camp for a great breakfast of hash and eggs.  For lunch, Peter made grilled cheese and ham with Oscar's smoked mustard.  Dinner was Norwell sourced: I brought Canadian goose breasts and Kurt brought venison rump roast.  Peter added twice baked potatoes over the newly repaired fire ring, added a little pinot grigio and we were good. For dinner on Friday, Kurt was on his venison, which included rump cuts and the back straps, while Peter prepared the brookies.  Jeff and I got the fire ready while Kurt and Peter prepped the Vidalia onions and asparagus for grilling, and a mushroom sauce and mushrooms.  It was outstanding.  Peter brought out some killer carrot cake.  Saturday’s dinner and our final meal was a week-in-review: moose and venison, trout hash, and some brussel sprouts with garlic and onion.

     

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    Fishing

    When we arrived on Tuesday, Peter and Jeff had left us a canoe at the road. They were gone, so we just left our stuff and hit the water.  Kurt caught two walleyes.  His second one was closer to 22", so we kept it.

    On Wednesday, we headed out early because we had reserved a day at Benewah, a 300 acre lake with no stocked fish.  I broke the ice with a small speckled trout, and Kurt tagged one soon after. After taking a few more passes along the eastern shore, Kurt and I broke off to explore the little inlet cove.  We caught - didn't boat - some small brookies at another lake above Benewah.  At the bridge crossing the Fil de Grande - a north to south river that drains into the Dumoine - Jeff scored with two pike, the first small, the second respectable, and that seemed to spook the rest.

    It was raining on Thursday, so I started the day with a short fishing excursion here on Cullen, heading to Third Chain when the rain broke off slightly.  We were skunked at Third Chain, and returned to camp with plans for fishing elsewhere later in the afternoon.

    On Friday we headed out early.  The sun was already up over much of the lake, so Peter and I headed to the eastern shore to fish the shaded shore.  We began in shallow water, and I had a hit on my Wabbler and worm.  Further along the same shore, I caught a maybe 12", which we kept by choice for dinner.  Before we were done, we had caught about a dozen brook trout and kept five, releasing the rest.  Jeff and Kurt were slinging tin, and while they didn't have the same success, were also both rewarded with several fish, losing two on a stringer.  On Lake Robinson, we tried several different lures with no success.  I finally tried a north river Rapala, and hooked quickly into a couple small walleyes.  Below the falls onto the slow water, Kurt tried a top water frog imitation, and Peter a gold Phoebe, but nothing produced pike.

    On Saturday, we fished Cullen in the morning for pike.   Jeff and Peter were planning to cast along the left edge, but with the breeze down the lake we decided to paddle a quarter mile up the shore.  Kurt was using a jitterbug from Bill Drummy, a top water splashy twitchy bright thing. He had only a few casts before he caught onto something substantial.  This was by far the broadest and longest fish we caught.  We fished the same cove to the left of the main body of water below the old heron rookery.

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    Tags: Lake Benwah, fishing, trout, trout fishing, dumoine, fishing blog, good food, Lake Robinson

    Fishing in Dumoine – licensing changes

    Posted by Geoffrey Gordon on Mon, Jun 18, 2012 @ 10:23 AM

    turn off the road toward quebecWhen visting the Dumoine region of Quebec, I’m struck first by what has changed, and then by what has stayed the same.   The man-made changes are usually more surprising, because the natural changes are such a part of the environment to be predictable in their dynamism.

    This year the man-made changes included a new licensing station location.   The licensure in Quebec is a byzantine operation created by the quebecois government many years ago; its original intent is hard to figure, but the net effect is a complicated system that seems to be more about holding on to make-work desk jobs in tired old air conditioned offices than managing a fishing stock. 

    Fishing in Quebec is controlled by ZECs (Zone-d'Exploitation-Contrôlée, meaning controlled harvesting). The first stop has always been to obtain a transit pass at the Rapides des Joachim (Swisha) ZEC.  Then, about an hour in, one has to buy a Quebec fishing license and a ZEC Dumoine 1, 3, 7-day or year fishing license at the ZEC Dumoine station.  A 3-day Quebec and Dumoine license costs about $90.   What the woman at the Swisha ZEC (where we got our transit pass, just off the paved road) didn’t tell us, was that the Dumoine licensure station had moved to a trailer about a mile back out on the paved road.  So after an hour on bush roads, we found the station closed and had to re-trace our steps to get our actual fishing licenses.  Fortunately, these stations keep long hours, so the extra two hours of driving across poor sandy roads didn’t prevent us from fishing early the next morning.  

    Moving both ZEC licensing offices closer together and near where the road turns to bush road makes sense, even if we did miss the trailer the first time by.  Maybe they’ll combine the offices, but that would mean losing the opportunity to pay someone to transcribe name and address information and collect a fee.   

    swisha air signThe road across the Swisha ZEC hadn’t changed much, be we were pleased to see that the Dumoine roads had been dragged, culverts cleared of beaver dams, even a new culvert installed.  Thus, the roads were greatly improved from last year.

    The changes that are constant are in the natural world.   For our five day stay (with three days of active fishing), we learned that the water temperature (taken at West Trout) was a balmy 62 degrees after the mild winter.  This is generally too warm for trout to feed aggressively, and our trout count (3) was weak.   We were skunked at our first lake, Whiskey, a normally well-stocked, easily accessible lake, and a proven good early hit.  In addition, high pressure weather followed us in, making the sun hotter and the wind calmer over each successive day.   That’s pike and walleye weather.

    Our second attempt at trout was at a highly controlled, natural-only (no stocked fish) Lake Benwah.   A special pass is required, and fishermen must report total caught, pardoned (released) and kept (eaten) on departure.   This usually productive water yielded two trout, only one worth keeping, with two canoes on the water early, and working for about three hours.     Thus, we changed our program to meet the conditions.  That afternoon we headed into the waters of the Fil de Grande, a mostly river, relatively fast moving body of water on the way home from Benwah.   Upstream from where the river crosses under the road is Lake Dixon.  At Lake Dixon we got well into the northern pike.  In fishing lingo, we touched a lot of big fish.

    The next morning, we decided to explore our camp lake, Lake Cullen, known for northern pike and walleye, a little better.   We got our even earlier that we had for Benwah, and fished new areas of the lake with great success, before breakfast.

    A great way to become familiar with the region is to join a club such as the Dumoine Rod and Gun Club, which maintains an array of cabins with easy access, on great lakes.  Members of these clubs also have years of great experiences they're usually glad to share.

    On balance, the trip was a success.  One noteworthy change was the lack of bugs.  Normally the black flies and mosquitoes are ruthless, infinite, and never ending.   One should never travel to water country without proper preparation.  In addition to your favorite bug spray, don’t leave behind a bug head net

    bug jacket,

    and even if you’re in a bug-proof cabin, I strongly recommend Coughlin’s mosquito netting to assure a good night’s sleep.

     

    Changing objectives on conditions is part of the experience of fishing in Quebec.  While we only ate trout one night, the fishing experience was fulfilling.  We’ll have to see what next year’s conditions bring.  Maybe we’ll get lucky and miss the bugs.

    Geoff Gordon

    Tags: vacation, travel, trip, Dumoine fishing, Dumoine licenses, ZEC Dumoine, Lake Whisky, Lake Benwah, Lake Dixon, Fil-de-Grande, canada

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